Tag Archives: spring

Valentines Day Cute Picture Card Craft

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We put together a pretty picture card for Valentines day (or any occasion) using scrap art and sewing supplies I had on hand. Each of my kids ages 2-9 got to make their own and the result is still really cute! Of course, I had to do the cutting on Peewee’s.

Supplies

  • 1″ pictures
  • scrapbook paper or other colorful paper (for a fun twist, you could have the kids make their own)
  • scissors
  • glue stick
  • hole punch
  • ribbon
  • button

You’ll need to print various pictures. Approximately 1″ size. Regular printer paper works fine and is easy for the kids to glue. Cut out the pictures, then have the kids select their background paper. I used a large scrapbook paper deck. You’ll need 18″x 2″ strips of paper so plan accordingly.

Fold the paper into four equal sections. I did this by first folding the right sides together the long way (18″ in half so you can’t see the pattern) then folding back each side so the pattern shows. An accordian with print on one side and blank on the other. Here is Captain Obvious with his folded and ready to go.

Next we glued the pictures to the pretty side of the paper, being careful to avoid the creases. The kids did this themselves and came up with some really fun ways to place their pictures. I didn’t censor them at all except to slide an image over slightly if it overlapped the edge. Scarfunkle is pleased with his card. He chose to use a flag button and red and white ribbon, reminding me that this is a great craft for any occasion.

Punch a hole in one end of your picture card. Darn, I couldn’t find my hole punch so I carefully punched a hole with a dull pencil. Once your hole is punched you will need to select matching ribbon and a button. Cut an approximately 24″ piece of ribbon. You may need a little more if you have trouble (like I did) getting the ribbon to thread through the button and end up fraying the ends. Below is Loud Kiddington’s “matching” ribbon selection and his very own placement of pictures.

Once the pictures are dried enough to handle the card–we glued everything in the process–you can thread the ribbon through the hole, leaving a 1″ tail then thread through your button (on the front side), back through the button and the hole to the back of your card. Fold the card up and wrap the ribbon around twice then wrap the end of the ribbon around the button.

I didn’t have to tie any knots, the ribbon was snug in the button and wrapped nicely but you may have to get creative if you ribbon is silky or narrow and doesn’t want to stay. Peewee inspects her card after I’ve wrapped it up. “Where my boys?” she asks.

Below is the card, wrapped up and ready to go. We’ll have to see how much postage is since I included a button. 🙂 The end result is such a cute card and would sit nicely on someone’s work desk or counter. You could even attach a couple magnets to the back if you know it’s likely to go straight on the frig.

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Filed under Craft/Art Coral

2010 Garden Drawing

It’s a little late but I finally got my garden plan drawn up and scanned. I’ve added a 12′ x12′ square plot that is outside the fence and am tempting the deer to eat my onions. 🙂

 

Then there is my original garden. I haven’t yet had the heart to let my husband cut down the tree I taught the  boys to climb in so I’ve got to plant around the shade spot with sun lovers and track that shade for the cool weather plants. We’ll see how successful I am!

I know it’s small. If you can’t see you can click the zoom button that should be at the bottom right corner of your screen. It is on your computer not wordpress. Unfortunately wordpress doesn’t have a “click for full size picture option yet”.

Have you had any luck in your garden yet?

My tomatoes hate this cool weather but I snuck in beets and radishes between rows and they are growing like crazy. No zuccini yet, they like warm soil and no luck with my special Idaho variety watermelon that I have been so excited about. 😦

They peas, beans, onions, lettuce, carrots, beets, radishes, cucumber, garlic, cilantro, sunflowers (amazingly) and even the corn are doing well but everything else seems stunted.

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Go ahead, run with sticks! The things moms sometimes say.

There’s nothing that helps improve my mood better than spending time outside. Most of the time it doesn’t matter what I’m doing.

My best friend shares my love of the mountains, rivers, trees etc. Before kids we’d spend entire days out on our horses in the Idaho mountains often ending up taking a dip in the lake before heading home trying to beat the sun.

These days it’s a bit harder to get out in the great outdoors like that but when she suggested we explore the woods by her house and look for unique sticks to decorate with, I couldn’t resist! Neither one of us even considered the eight kids between us ranging in age from 3 months to 8 years. When mountain raised mom’s raise kiddo’s, you’d better believe they can hike with the best of us right from the womb.

Actually, it’s too often that we allow our circumstances to keep us from doing the things we love especially when those things (like hiking) can be so healthy for the kids as well. Truth be told, many times as mom’s we don’t think, “Hey, they can come too.” Instead we struggle with wanting babysitters or school to whisk them away and grow them up so we can get back to the things we once did. I’ve fallen into that trap, thinking that I have to just wait until my kids are grown.

I’m so glad she suggested the hike. We were on the mountain for a good couple of hours, exploring different tree species, wildflowers and of course running with sticks!

Thanks Deb, for reminding me that I don’t have to wait!  The kids needed it as much as we did.

So, what fun and free things can you do with your kids. Did you enjoy people watching at the mall before having kids? Grab a stroller, or two or three 🙂 and head to the mall.

I guess I realize now, as a “maturing” mom (haha) that loneliness, isolation, the “I can do it myself” mentality STINKS! Get out and do something with other moms. Raid the local Starbucks, visit the library, swing in the rain. The “rules” we make about nap times and overstimulation (I’ve decided) are a bunch of hooey! Though I have to say, I’ve been down those roads before. But, as many of you know, I’ve also been down the Postpartum Depression road TWICE. Much of it may have been avoided had I just gone out and done something rather than sit at home making sure everyone had a perfectly scheduled day.

When Deb and I get together now we bring fruit and cheese sticks, taquito’s or sandwiches and just spend the day. If we run out of diapers, we share. If someone wets their pants we get them something to wear and if socks never come back, life goes on.

Here is a cute recipe my bestfriend sent home with me for my frig. It sums it up perfectly.

Recipe for Preserving Children

  • 1 large grassy field
  • 6 (or more) children in assorted sizes
  • 3 small dogs (give or take)
  • 1 narrow pebbly brook
  • 1 hot sun
  • flowers
  • deep blue sky

Mix the children with the dogs and empty into the field, ,stirring continuously. Sprinkle the field with flowers. Pour the brook gently over the pebbles. Cover all with a deep blue sky and bake in hot sun. When children are well browned, they may be removed. They will be found ready to be put away to cool in the bathtub!

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Filed under Random, Reality, Ruse

Why would I plant a dead tree?

As many of you know, when nicer weather hits I take every opportunity to be outside. That might mean you’ll be “seeing” less of me here.

But I thought I’d share one of my recent crazy projects.

Transplanting trees!

Our property was logged before we bought it and the only spot with decent trees is in one steep corner, farthest from the house. In that corner are a variety of decent trees, as well as tons of saplings. Everything is far too packed. So, I’ve decided, while the ground is soft, to try and relocate some of those trees.

Here’s a Fir I planted in the backyard. Taz loves to help with projects.

But what’s up with this tree? I am obsessed with this little dead tree. But why?

Well. Because of these…

And this…

Stay tuned to find out why I can’t get enough of these “dead” trees! I’ll show you pictures along the way. What a transformation this deciduous conifer makes. I love it!

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Filed under Gardening, Thru the Lens

Vegetable Garden Plan 2009

What’s going in your garden?

I have not drawn up my 2010 garden yet but it’s time to order seeds in the northwest where the growing season is a scant 90 days. Make sure to read the packet so you don’t try to grow something that takes 110 days or more. Ya, I would know! 🙂 Now, I try to get varieties that mature in 80 days or less because if you loose some seedlings in your first plant you still have a little time to recover.

garden

Here is last years garden post:

I spent my weekend plotting the vegetable garden and dreaming about dirt!

Today it’s finally sunny. We’ve had so much rain the springs are swollen and taking their yearly adventure into the nearby fields.  Mud is abundant yet the ground underneith is still frozen.  The Farmer’s Alminac says we have until the middle of May before it’s okay to plant in the ground but I’m going to wait until the end of May to be sure.  I’m sure having a hard time waiting.  I just love to put on my overalls and spend hours with dirt on my knees.  That’s a good position for many reasons. On my knees I’m eye level with my little one’s, I’m close enough to the ground to smell the damp fertile earth and best of all working the dirt reminds me of how wonderfully we are made!

Today our school project is planting the seeds that we can indoors.  We are going to plant a little of everything indoors so the kids can “experiment” with what works and what doesn’t.  I’m hoping to coax some corn up early though I’m doubting wether I can get it safely transplanted.  I also don’t expect the cucumber or beans to transplant well since I haven’t had luck with that before.

Here are the heirloom seeds I purchased for my garden this year:

  • Beans, Blue Marbut:  70 days.  A colorful, tasty, southern heirloom. Colorful purplish stems and purple tint to the leaves. Tasty, purple streaked green pods.
  • Beans, Greasy Back Cornfield:  75 days.  Heirloom pole snap bean, white seeds. Grows well planted with corn and using the cornstalks as a pole to climb
  • Carrot, Coreless Amsterdam:  57 days.  Very early. Roots average 6″ long and are straight all the way to the end. Excellent for use as “Baby Carrots”.
  • Carrot, Snow White:  70 days.  Tender, creamy white
  • Corn, Black Mexican:  82 days.  6 foot stalks, with 8 to 10 rows per 7 to 8 inch ear. Starts out pure snow white and turns to purple then black. Eat as a sweet corn when white. Dates to 1863
  • Corn, Blue Pop:  100 days.  I got this from Gurneys close to 30 years ago. It was never all blue like I thought, but is brightly colored blue, yellow and other colors mixed. Ears are nice sized, pearl type.
  • Corn, Clem Bennett:  75 days.  6 to 7 foot stalks, 12 to 14 rows of yellow kernels on 9″ ears. 1 oz
  • Cucumber, Lemon:  60 days.  Super tasty globe shaped lemon colored skin
  • Cucumber, Monastic:  65 days.  Dual purpose, short, fat pickling type, cream colored when young, will also work as a small slicer
  • Garden Huckleberry 90 days.
  • Golden Zucchini:  53 days.  Bush type, bright yellow, 8 to 10 inch fruits
  • Lettuce,Black Seeded Simpson:  50 days. A chartreuse, green-yellow color.
  • Lettuce, May Queen:  50 days.  19th century heirloom, earliest butterhead type, pale green tinged with brown
  • Lettuce, Romaine:  65 days.  Erect, tightly folded plants
  • Lettuce, Waldman’s Green:  55 days.  Large, wavy, frilled leaves, a nice dark green leaf lettuce, tolerates cold weather well.
  • Peas, Alderman (Tall Telephone):  75 days.  I remember how much I enjoyed growing this variety in the cooler Springs in the Northwest. There it would reach 6 feet tall and be loaded with pods. Our rapidly changing climate here makes them shorter.
  • Pepper, (sweet) Early Niagara Giant:  64 days.  A nice, early selection of a green bell. Fruits will turn red in about 95 days
  • Pepper, (sweet) Frank’s:  56 days.  Our most productive pepper ever. Plants are very compact with a solid pack of fruits. Good for fresh use or for cooking. Turn red quickly. Fruits are a medium size, elongated bell shape. Very sweet flavor
  • Tomato, Chipollino:  mid, Ind, round, red globe, 3 oz. fruits
  • Tomato, Yellow Out Red In:  late, SD, solid 6 oz. globe, tart, the best of the keeping tomatoes
     

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Filed under Gardening